Windows can not access the specified device,path or file. windows 2003

Windows can not access the specified device,path or file. windows 2003

Some time you copied a file on windows 2003 server and want to execute you got an error “Windows cannot access the specified device, path or file. You may not have the appropriate permissions to access the item.”

Right Click on file go to properties >

On General Tab you will find “This file came from another computer and might be blocked to help protect this computer”

Click on unblock button you should be able to execute the file.

 

You have logged in with temporary profile. You cannot access your files copied to this profile

You have logged in with temporary profile. You cannot access your files copied to this profile

Last week I got an issue with users profiles on windows 7 Machine.I cleared the registery key and its worked for me. “You have logged in with temporary profile. You cannot access your files copied to this profile. Please see event log for details.to fix this log off and try logging on later. For details or contact your system administrator”.

Log on the machine as an local Administrator ::

Click >Start >run >type regedit Find the following key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ProfileList :         There are a lot of folders in the key. Find the ones with the .BAK at the end Delete the profiles with the .BAK extention (Make sure you take a backup of the registry first)

Close Regedit

Restart PC

The trust relationship between this workstation and the primary domain failed

The trust relationship between this workstation and the primary domain failed

We power off some servers windows 2008 for more then one month and as we powerd on its started giving error while login in to the domain .”The trust relationship between this workstation and the primary domain failed ”

I got the articles and tested and used one which worked for me http://support.microsoft.com/kb/325850

Steps :-1 login local with administrator and password (.\Administrator)

Step :-2 run CMD with Run as Administrator

netdom.exe resetpwd /s:<server> /ud:<user> /pd:*
<server> = a domain controller in the joined domain
< user> = DOMAIN\User format with rights to change the computer password

For Example :- My Domain name :- DC.gkhan.in Username gkhanadmin

>netdom.exe resetpwd /s:DC.gkhan.in /ud:gkhan\gkhanadmin /pd:*

Step :-3 Reboot the machine

So I added this article for me to remmember for the next time .

How to find FSMO Roles and Seize in windows 2008.

How to find FSMO Roles and Seize in windows 2008.

Domain wide roles are configured in Active Directory users and computers. Right click and select domain and here option is operations master.
Forest roles Domain Naming master is configured in active directory domain and trust right click and select operations master. It will let you know the roles.

(c)Forest roles Schema Master is not accessible from any tool as they want to prevent this. Editing schema can create serious problem in active directory environment. To gain access you need to create snap-in and register dll file by regsvr32 schmmgmt.dll.
Seizing of Roles

In case of failures of any server you need to seize the roles. This is how it can be done:

For Schema Master:

Go to cmd prompt and type ntdsutil
Continue reading How to find FSMO Roles and Seize in windows 2008.

FSMO placement and optimization on Active Directory domain controllers

FSMO placement and optimization on Active Directory domain controllers

Certain domain and enterprise-wide operations that are not well suited to multi-master updates must be performed on a single domain controller in the domain or in the forest. The purpose of having a single-master owner is to define a well-known target for critical operations and to prevent the introduction of conflicts or latency that could be created by multi-master updates. Having a single-operation master means that the relevant FSMO role owner must be online, discoverable, and available on the network by computers needing to perform FSMO dependent operations.
Continue reading FSMO placement and optimization on Active Directory domain controllers

FSMO Roles

FSMO Roles in Microsoft Active Directory Domain Controller

  • Schema Master – One master role holder per forest. The schema master FSMO role holder is the domain controller responsible for performing updates to the directory schema.
  • Domain Naming Master – One master role holder per forest. The domain naming master FSMO role holder is the DC responsible for making changes to the forest-wide domain name space of the directory.
  • Infrastructure Master – One master role holder per domain. The infrastructure FSMO role holder is the DC responsible for updating an object’s SID and distinguished name in a cross-domain object reference.
  • RID Master – One master role holder per domain. The RID master FSMO role holder is the single DC responsible for processing RID Pool requests from all DCs within a given domain.
  • PDC Emulator – One master role holder per domain. The PDC emulator FSMO role holder is a Windows 2000 DC that advertises itself as the primary domain controller (PDC) to earlier version workstations, member servers, and domain controllers. It is also the Domain Master Browser and handles password discrepancies.

Microsoft Service Packs

Microsoft Service Packs

A service pack (SP) is a Windows update, often combining previously released updates, that helps make Windows more reliable. Service packs, which are provided free of charge on this page, can include security and performance improvements and support for new types of hardware. Make sure you install the latest service pack to help keep Windows up to date

Download Links for Microsoft service packs for  all  products click here

Configure TCP/IP from the Command Prompt

Configure TCP/IP from the Command Prompt

In order to configure TCP/IP settings such as the IP address, Subnet Mask, Default Gateway, DNS and WINS addresses and many other options you can use Netsh.exe. and ncpa.cpl

 network connections window: from command prompt   >  ncpa.cpl

Netsh.exe is a command-line scripting utility that allows you to, either locally or remotely, display or modify the network configuration of a computer that is currently running. Netsh.exe also provides a scripting feature that allows you to run a group of commands in batch mode against a specified computer. Netsh.exe can also save a configuration script in a text file for archival purposes or to help you configure other servers.

Netsh.exe is available on Windows 2000, Windows XP and Windows Server 2003.

You can use the Netsh.exe tool to perform the following tasks:

  • Configure interfaces
  • Configure routing protocols
  • Configure filters
  • Configure routes
  • Configure remote access behavior for Windows-based remote access routers that are running the Routing and Remote Access Server (RRAS) Service
  • Display the configuration of a currently running router on any computer
  • Use the scripting feature to run a collection of commands in batch mode against a specified router.

What can we do with Netsh.exe?

With Netsh.exe you can easily view your TCP/IP settings. Type the following command in a Command Prompt window (CMD.EXE):

netsh interface ip show config

With Netsh.exe, you can easily configure your computer’s IP address and other TCP/IP related settings. For example:

The following command configures the interface named Local Area Connection with the static IP address 192.168.0.100, the subnet mask of 255.255.255.0, and a default gateway of 192.168.0.1:

netsh interface ip set address name="Local Area Connection" static 192.168.0.100 255.255.255.0 192.168.0.1 1

(The above line is one long line, copy paste it as one line)

Netsh.exe can be also useful in certain scenarios such as when you have a portable computer that needs to be relocated between 2 or more office locations, while still maintaining a specific and static IP address configuration. With Netsh.exe, you can easily save and restore the appropriate network configuration.

  

First, connect your portable computer to location #1, and then manually configure the required settings (such as the IP address, Subnet Mask, Default Gateway, DNS and WINS addresses). 

Now, you need to export your current IP settings to a text file. Use the following command:

netsh -c interface dump > c:\location1.txt

When you reach location #2, do the same thing, only keep the new settings to a different file:

netsh -c interface dump > c:\location2.txt

You can go on with any other location you may need, but we’ll keep it simple and only use 2 examples.

Now, whenever you need to quickly import your IP settings and change them between location #1 and location #2, just enter the following command in a Command Prompt window (CMD.EXE):

netsh -f c:\location1.txt

or

netsh -f c:\location2.txt

and so on.

You can also use the global EXEC switch instead of -F:

netsh exec c:\location2.txt

Netsh.exe can also be used to configure your NIC to automatically obtain an IP address from a DHCP server:

netsh interface ip set address "Local Area Connection" dhcp

Would you like to configure DNS and WINS addresses from the Command Prompt? You can. See this example for DNS:

netsh interface ip set dns "Local Area Connection" static 192.168.0.200

and this one for WINS:

netsh interface ip set wins "Local Area Connection" static 192.168.0.200

Or, if you want, you can configure your NIC to dynamically obtain it’s DNS settings:

netsh interface ip set dns "Local Area Connection" dhcp

BTW, if you want to set a primary and secondary DNS address, add index=1 and index=2 respectively to the lines of Netsh command.

As you now see, Netsh.exe has many features you might find useful, and that goes beyond saying even without looking into the other valuable options that exist in the command.

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